Mozambique Cyclone Rescuers Struggle to Reach Victims in ‘Inland Ocean’

MAPUTO, Mozambique — Rescue workers struggled Tuesday to reach areas devastated by a huge cyclone in Mozambique, as heavy rains swelled rivers and further isolated flooded communities in what aid agencies called the worst natural disaster in southern Africa in two decades.

In central Mozambique, the area hit hardest by Cyclone Idai, overflowing rivers created “an inland ocean” where countless people were still marooned, a United Nations official said.

Rescue workers reported seeing people on rooftops and in trees days after the storm struck. In areas near the rivers, homes were submerged, with water rising near the tops of telephone poles.

“We took an aerial survey, and as far as the eye can see, there was flooding, and deep as well,” said Jamie LeSueur, who was leading rescue efforts in central Mozambique for the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. “What we are now facing is large-scale flooding on top of an area already devastated by the cyclone.”

The storm swept across Mozambique on Thursday night before turning inland into neighboring Malawi and Zimbabwe. It is believed to have affected more than 1.5 million people in the three nations.

The countries, among the world’s poorest, have limited capacity to respond to the disaster, and officials called for outside help. Relief officials warned that delays in reaching survivors could lead to an outbreak of illnesses, including cholera and malaria.

“This cyclone has come at a very huge human cost,” Nick Mangwana, a spokesman for the Zimbabwean government, said on Twitter. “We certainly need a regional approach to these effects of global warming. These problems are transnational.”

In Mozambique, several aid agencies focused their efforts on Beira, a port city of half a million people that was all but destroyed by the storm. A cargo plane loaded with emergency supplies was able to land at the airport there, but aid groups struggled to distribute the goods to affected areas.

[Cyclone Idai explained: What happened and what’s being done.]

The main highway into the city remained impassable, while secondary roads were being cleared of fallen trees and other debris, said Saul Butters, CARE’s assistant director for Mozambique.

“We have 13 articulated trucks that are unable to get into the city,” Mr. Butters said, adding that the agency was now organizing airlifts by helicopter.

Until isolated communities are reached, relief workers said, it is impossible to estimate the number of casualties. The official death toll in Mozambique was 84, though President Filipe Nyusi said on Monday that it could climb to more than 1,000.

Beira, which is Mozambique’s fourth-largest city and faces the Indian Ocean, remained without electricity and telephone service on Tuesday.

After hitting Beira on Thursday night, the cyclone moved the next day into Chimanimani, a rural district in Zimbabwe near the border with Mozambique.

Officials at Doctors Without Borders said they had been unable to reach Chimanimani because of destroyed roads and bridges, but the group was providing services at a center outside the area.

On Tuesday in Chimanimani, burials were held for some of the victims of the storm.

Absalom Makanga, a leader of the Salvation Church in Chimanimani, said by phone that 40 victims in a low-income area called Ngangu had been buried.

“Our resident pastor officiated at the burials because we could not get there because of the poor state of the roads destroyed by the cyclone,” Mr. Makanga said.

Rutendo Rukavi, a volunteer who was helping the flood victims in Chimanimani, said that she had witnessed makeshift burials for the dead, including for an 83-year-old man.

“It was sad,” Ms. Rukavi said. “People were just being buried in the midst of the debris that remained of their homes.”

In Malawi, heavy rains have caused severe flooding in 14 southern districts near the Mozambican border, including Chikwawa and Nsanje.

In Chikwawa, the worst-affected area, nine people have died and more than 54,000 people have been displaced.

Lusizi Mshani, district commissioner for Chikwawa, said by phone that the displaced were staying in severely overcrowded government-run camps, each holding about 5,000 people.

Mr. Mshani said that most people affected by the floods had now been moved to the camps.

“The water level has gone down, and people in the lower areas have been moved to higher ground,” he said. But, he said, the displaced were now in desperate need of new shelter, food, clean water and medicine.

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This Is Lupita Nyong’o. Hollywood, Please Keep Up.

AUSTIN, Tex. — When she was around 11, Lupita Nyong’o’s parents brought home a cassette tape that changed her life. It was of the song “Regulate” by the West Coast hip-hop dynasts Warren G and Nate Dogg. Nyong’o and her five siblings, then living in a suburb of Nairobi, could only partially savor the lyrics of the song — a hearty, slang-ridden narrative of a thwarted mugging, topped with a soupçon of ceremonial group sex. But the music was hypnotic and evocative, suggesting an absorbing pocket universe. Nyong’o remembers wearing the tape out, rewinding it over and over until she knew all of the words by heart.

Of the many apparently effortless but difficult-to-emulate things the 36-year-old star of “Us,” the new psychological horror film from Jordan Peele, has done in front of a camera, it’s worth taking a moment to consider the rapping. She’s done it twice, both times in videos filmed in the back seat of a car and posted on Instagram: the first to celebrate her three millionth follower and the second with her “Black Panther” co-star Letitia Wright, on the week of the film’s premiere.

No one would call Nyong’o the next Warren G, but something about watching her rap disturbs an inner accountant. Here is a person whose very first appearance in a feature film, as the unforgettable Patsey in “12 Years a Slave” (2013), made her the seventh black woman and first black African to win an Academy Award for acting; a person whose doll-like facial symmetry and frictionless skin has landed her four solo appearances on the cover of Vogue; a person who speaks four languages and holds a graduate degree from Yale.

And this same person, wearing dark sunglasses and facetiously calling herself Troublemaker, reveals that she also can rap, with appropriate levels of insouciance and conviction, and while remaining on beat. One suspects the divine dealer of dereliction of duty.

Nyong’o discussed her hip-hop hobby on an afternoon earlier this month in Austin, where she had come to the South by Southwest film festival to unveil “Us,” due March 22. Like the rap videos, her foray into horror represents both an abstention from, and an implicit critique of, the Hollywood playbook for stars of her pedigree. Though she has been deliberate about creating a space for herself in an industry that wasn’t built for her, inhabiting and defending that space is another matter. Nyong’o’s performance in “Us,” already earning ecstatic reviews, is a shot across the bow to anyone who would deny her her due.

It was overcast and humid. But we caught a breeze on a digressive walk around Lady Bird Lake on the edge of downtown. Nyong’o, who was dressed for an earlier panel discussion in a gray and black gingham pantsuit, black heels and matching round sunglasses, was trailed by two barrel-chested bodyguards, who kept a wide berth at their client’s polite but firm insistence. As we wound between naked trees down a semi-paved path, more than a few rubberneckers shot her adoring grins and sheepish waves.

Her normal life is much lower maintenance. She’s lived in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn for several years, having opted to stay on the East Coast after school, and spends quiet weekends going to the farmer’s market, or to local restaurants, where, she said with relief, “New Yorkers are too busy to recognize people.”

But such normalcy grows scarcer by the day. Nyong’o spent much of the last two years preparing for, shooting and promoting Marvel’s “Black Panther,” in which she played Nakia, an idealistic Wakandan spy and the hero’s love interest. The film’s worldwide success may turn the Oscar-winning actress into a blockbuster heroine, a rarefied combination that “Us” is positioned to affirm.

In it, she plays both Adelaide, the matriarch of the charming Wilson family, and Red, her bloodthirsty doppelgänger. Peele wrote the characters with Nyong’o in mind, and the two were close collaborators on interpreting the script. They met for the first time shortly after Nyong’o wrapped “Panther” (during production of that film, the actress and lifelong horror fan organized a cast field trip to see Peele’s surprise 2017 smash, “Get Out”) and quickly hit it off.

“He was really inviting of my thoughts and ideas,” she said. “He’ll have this kernel of an idea that is so strong, and then he’ll keep adding to it and clarifying his intentions as he goes along. When he cast me in the movie, I joined him in that process.”

In an interview, Peele said he was grateful for the second pair of eyes. “Right out of the gate she was asking questions about the characters that I didn’t know the answer to — and I knew everything about them,” he said.

In the film’s story, as carefully as it can be described without spoilers, Adelaide embarks on a beachside vacation with her husband (fellow “Black Panther” alumnus Winston Duke) and their two children. It turns cataclysmic when another family of mysterious origin — their mirror images, but as filtered through a particularly ghastly nightmare — shows up on their doorstep.

Peele seeded his script with cryptic prompts for the look and feel of Adelaide’s evil double. One concerned Red’s movement, which Peele conveyed with just two exceptionally creepy words: Queen cockroach.

Another prompt indicated that Red had a scratchy voice, as if withered from lack of use. That seed — contained in a single sentence on the page — was fertilized when Nyong’o attended a fashion event where, to her surprise, she heard a speaker whose voice she thought sounded close to what Peele was describing. The speaker was Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who has spasmodic dysphonia, a neurological disorder that causes involuntary spasms of the larynx. In the film, Nyong’o’s hair-raising performance is defined by a haunting amplification of the disorder, which sounds like what might happen if you swallowed a cheese grater.

Nyong’o’s set debut in costume as Red, for a long, unbroken monologue that fills in the character’s life story, was one of the most dramatic moments of the shoot.

“She walked into the room and you just felt the air suck out of it,” Peele said. “The first time she did that scene was magic. I think we shot it like 10 times — just because we could — and it was always gold.”

On the trail in Austin, Nyong’o was recalling how she fell in love with acting when something — someone — broke her focus. It was a large man in a faded T-shirt and white earbuds walking behind us, talking so loudly that we were struggling to hear one another. Nyong’o stopped and turned around. As the man passed by, she gave him a look of such elegant and devastating ferocity that I thought he might evaporate mid-stride, leaving only the earbuds behind. The bodyguards may not have been necessary after all.

Her aunt had been a theater actress in Nairobi, and Nyong’o’s siblings and cousins would perform short skits at family gatherings. Acting was a way to win attention from (and manipulate the emotions of) her mother and father, who defied the stereotype of African parents by encouraging their children to pursue their passions.

Both accompanied their daughter to the “Us” premiere. Nyong’o’s father, Peter, is a politician and the governor of Kisumu County in Kenya. As a young college professor and critic of former President Daniel arap Moi, he temporarily exiled himself and his family to Mexico City, where Nyong’o was born and given a Spanish name inspired by their adopted home. Her mother, Dorothy, is a public relations consultant and the managing trustee of the Africa Cancer Foundation, founded by her husband.

Nyong’o credited her mother in particular for her self-confidence.

“She’s dignified in the things she knows, and she’s dignified in the things she doesn’t,” she said. “She’s not afraid to admit that she has something to learn. And that quality is something that I seek to emulate — to be able to be comfortable in the discomfort of not knowing, or the feeling that you’re unprepared.”

“Us” is only Nyong’o’s fourth live-action appearance in a film since her debut, and as a lead actress, she is still learning how and where she wants to apply herself. Many in her position would accept as much work as their schedules would bear, fearing the laws of gravity that can bring Hollywood prodigies abruptly back to earth. But here, too, Nyong’o has defied expectations. She believes her creativity is a finite resource and doesn’t offer it easily.

“I’m not creative all the time, I’m just not,” she said. “Each role depletes me in some way, and I know that I do my best work when I’ve had time to remain fallow.”

Being selective has meant saying no to star vehicles that other actresses would relish. After she won her Oscar, Nyong’o was approached to headline the American remake of the Mexican action thriller “Miss Bala,” but ultimately decided not to move forward with the project. (The film was released last month starring Gina Rodriguez.)

“I just realized that whatever I’m interested in didn’t fit into the story, so I chose to bow out,” Nyong’o said. “I didn’t feel like I had the right perspective for it.”

Her awareness that few historical models exist for female movie stars of color, particularly those with dark skin, has made her especially mindful of the example she is setting.

With “Black Panther,” Nyong’o was part of a seismic shift away from whiteness as the unquestioned default in American popular cinema. “Us,” in which the race of the central characters — though affirmatively black — is never depicted as remarkable, gave her a chance to take that shift a step further.

“It’s really not exceptional to be black, or to be African, and I think that’s a powerful statement in and of itself,” she said. “We can be seen and perceived as part and parcel of the global experience, because that is the truth.”

In Austin, where the sun had finally emerged, we left the lake behind and turned toward downtown, where Nyong’o was due at her hotel to get dressed for the “Us” premiere later that night.

Before we arrived, she told me a story about a time when she still felt beholden to the expectations of others. It was by way of explaining her excitement over another creative coup, as both producer and star of a coming mini-series adaptation of the novel “Americanah,” by the Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

As a young, Kenyan-Mexican actress living and working in America, Nyong’o said she had made a habit of suppressing her accent, a natural composite of the places she’s lived.

“I was only speaking in the American accent, because my feeling, and the feeling that was communicated to me in school, was that having an African accent would limit your possibilities,” she said.

After she wrapped “12 Years a Slave,” newly facing the prospect of a public life, the inauthenticity of her voice became a source of anxiety. Encouragement came from a novel Nyong’o was reading at the time, “Americanah,” in which the main character, Ifemelu, is a Nigerian immigrant who also attends an Ivy League school and also has given up her natural tongue.

Burdened eventually with shame and regret, longing to be seen — and heard — as her ordinarily extraordinary self, Ifemelu giddily repents.

“I remember I was on the subway when I was reading that,” Nyong’o said. “I just wept.”

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Pompeo calls for Gulf unity at start of Middle East tour

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has called for unity in the Gulf region, as has kicked off his Middle East tour with a stop in Kuwait City for the third US-Kuwait strategic dialogue session.

Pompeo will seek to strengthen cooperation on defence, cybersecurity and trade, during his stop in Kuwait, his spokesperson Robert Palladino said.  

Al Jazeera’s Jamal Elshayyal said the US top diplomat would also focus on creating “a breakthrough in finding a resolution to the GCC crisis” describing Pompeo’s visit to Kuwait as “the most challenging part of his trip”.

In June 2017, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt imposed an ongoing land, sea and air blockade on Qatar, accusing Doha of supporting terrorists. Qatar has vehemently denied these claims.

“The fact that these countries are not seeing eye to eye is stifling any sort of plans or policies the US wants to implement in the region,” Elshayyal said.

US President Donald Trump has initially backed the blockade of Qatar, but “it has since transpired that that was not only detrimental to the US’ interests in the region but more so to the peoples’ interests here in the region and the stability of the GCC,” Elshayyal explained.

Kuwait has been at the forefront of trying to find a resolution to this crisis and mediate between the other Arab Gulf countries, which remains in deadlock.

Kuwait’s foreign minister said that a long-awaited US peace proposal for the Middle East should factor in regional considerations and all stakeholders.

“We hope the plan will take into account the situation in the region and all the relevant parties,” Sheikh Sabah Khaled al-Sabah told a joint press conference with Pompeo.

Pompeo took time to pose for photographs with US embassy personnel and their families and met with members of the US Chamber of Commerce, as well as with US and Kuwaiti business leaders.

He also met with recent Kuwaiti graduates of US universities and exchange programmes.

‘Iran threat’

On the flight from the United States, Pompeo told reporters that he would discuss “strategic dialogue” and the need to combat “the threat posed by the Islamic Republic of Iran” with leaders in the region.

He will also push for a greater role for the Middle East Strategic Alliance, a US-sponsored Arab NATO aimed at uniting Washington’s Arab allies against Tehran.

After Kuwait Pompeo will fly to Israel where an election campaign is in its final weeks with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu locked in a close battle with centrist rivals.

While Washington insists it is not interfering in Israeli politics, his visit is seen as a sign of support for Netanyahu, who is struggling to keep his grip on power as he faces allegations of bribery, fraud and breach of trust ahead of the April 9 polls.

After his stop in Israel, Pompeo will head to Lebanon, where he is expected to focus on Hezbollah’s role in the region. 

SOURCE:
Al Jazeera and news agencies

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The Mueller Report Is Highly Anticipated. Here’s What We Already Know

Ivanka Trump

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Ivanka Trump
Michael D. Cohen said he briefed Ms. Trump and Donald Trump Jr. on the Moscow Trump Tower project during the campaign. She was also contacted by a Russian woman whose husband offered to help her father develop a separate real estate project in Moscow.

related events

Trump Tower Moscow

Russian Contacts

Jared Kushner

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Jared Kushner
As a senior campaign official, Mr. Trump’s son-in-law attended the Trump Tower Russia meeting. He was also told that a campaign aide had been approached about setting up a back-channel meeting between Mr. Trump and Mr. Putin, and that Donald Trump Jr. received a private message from WikiLeaks. As a senior transition adviser, Mr. Kushner met at Trump Tower with the Russian ambassador and discussed setting up a a way to communicate with Moscow during the transition. He also met with a Russian banker close to Mr. Putin in an attempt to establish a direct line of communication to the Russian president.

related events

Trump Tower Russia Meeting

Russian Contacts

Russian Sanctions

Hope Hicks

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Hope Hicks
A fixture of Mr. Trump’s inner circle throughout the campaign and in the White House, Ms. Hicks was involved in the drafting of a false statement in response to questions about the 2016 Trump Tower meeting arranged by Donald Trump Jr.

related events

Trump Tower Russia Meeting

Obstruction Inquiry

Rod J. Rosenstein

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Rod J. Rosenstein
Deputy attorney general who appointed the special counsel to investigate Russia’s election interference.

related events

Obstruction Inquiry

Robert S. Mueller III

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Robert S. Mueller III
The special counsel overseeing the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and the possible involvement of Mr. Trump’s campaign.

related events

Obstruction Inquiry

Alan Garten

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Alan Garten
The Trump Organization’s general counsel was involved in the drafting of the misleading statement about the 2016 Trump Tower meeting arranged by Donald Trump Jr.

related events

Trump Tower Russia Meeting

Stephen K. Bannon

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Stephen K. Bannon
Mr. Trump’s former campaign chairman and chief White House strategist emailed Roger J. Stone Jr. in October 2016 for insight into WikiLeaks’s plans to publish documents that could damage the Clinton campaign.

related events

Russian Sanctions

Jeff Sessions

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Jeff Sessions
Weeks after he was confirmed as attorney general, the former senator recused himself from any investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the election after revelations that he had failed to report encounters with the Russian ambassador during the campaign.

related events

Russian Contacts

Obstruction Inquiry

Carter Page

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Carter Page
Russian intelligence operatives tried to recruit Mr. Page, a foreign policy adviser to the 2016 Trump campaign, in 2013. During the campaign, Mr. Page gave a speech in Russia and met with at least one Russian government official in Moscow. He told at least four members of the campaign about his trip.

related events

Russian Contacts

Stephen Miller

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Stephen Miller
As a top adviser to the president, Mr. Miller helped draft a letter, which was never sent, that explained why the president wanted to fire James B. Comey. During the campaign, Mr. Miller was among top campaign officials whom George Papadopoulos told about his Russian contacts.

related events

Obstruction Inquiry

Sam Clovis

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Sam Clovis
Mr. Clovis was among the Trump campaign officials whom George Papadopoulos told about his contacts with Russians.

related events

Kellyanne Conway

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Kellyanne Conway
Ms. Conway was among the high-level campaign officials who were told by Donald Trump Jr. that WikiLeaks had contacted him.

related events

Thomas P. Bossert

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Thomas P. Bossert
A senior transition official and former deputy national security adviser who was aware of conversations about sanctions that occurred during the transition between Michael T. Flynn and the Russian ambassador.

related events

Russian Sanctions

Reince Priebus

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Reince Priebus
A senior transition official and former White House chief of staff, Mr. Priebus was forwarded an email exchange during the transition that said Michael T. Flynn was discussing sanctions with the Russian ambassador. In a December 2017 meeting in the West Wing, Mr. Trump asked Mr. Priebus how his interview had gone with the special counsel’s investigators and whether they had been “nice.”

related events

Russian Sanctions

Mark Corallo

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Mark Corallo
A former spokesman for Mr. Trump’s legal team who told Mr. Mueller about a conference call with Mr. Trump and Hope Hicks in which, he said, Ms. Hicks said that emails written by Donald Trump Jr. before the Trump Tower meeting “will never get out.”

related events

Obstruction Inquiry

Sarah Huckabee Sanders

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Sarah Huckabee Sanders
Ms. Sanders, the White House press secretary, initially said the president “certainly didn’t dictate” the false statement issued by Donald Trump Jr. about the Trump Tower Russia meeting.

related events

Trump Tower Russia Meeting

Jay Sekulow

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Jay Sekulow
Mr. Trump’s private lawyer initially said the president was not involved in a false statement about the Trump Tower Russia meeting. Separately, Mr. Cohen has alleged that Mr. Trump’s lawyers, including Mr. Sekulow, helped with Mr. Cohen’s false testimony to Congress about a proposed Trump Tower project in Moscow.

related events

Trump Tower Russia Meeting

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Video: Watch D’Angelo Russell Drop 27 of 44 Points in 4th Quarter vs. Kings

Brooklyn Nets point guard D’Angelo Russell scored 27 of his 44 points in the fourth quarter as the Nets overcame a 28-point second-half deficit to defeat the Sacramento Kings 123-121 on Tuesday at Golden 1 Center.

Russell shot 17-of-33 on the night and also added 12 assists and four steals.

The Nets engineered their largest comeback in franchise history with the win.

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What to Watch on Wednesday: The series debut of Hulu’s The Act and Michael Bublé’s musical special

We know TV has a lot to offer, be it network, cable, premium channels, or streaming platforms including Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, Apple, Facebook Watch, and elsewhere. So EW is here to help, guiding you every single day to the things that should be on your radar. Check out our recommendations below, and click here to learn how you can stream our picks via your own voice-controlled smart-speaker (Alexa, Google Home) or podcast app (Spotify, iTunes, Google Play).

 

The Act

HOW/WHEN & WHERE TO WATCH: Streaming on Hulu

Series Debut
The toxic, secret-filled relationship between Gypsy Rose Blanchard and her oppressive mother, Dee Dee, which ended in a twisted murder, is the foundation of Hulu’s true-crime anthology series The Act, starring Oscar and Emmy winner Patricia Arquette as Dee Dee and Joey King as Gypsy Rose. “Getting into the emotion and getting into the character of Gypsy was something I was so excited to tackle, but I was also admittedly super-nervous for,” King tells EW. “This is the first time I’ve ever gotten the privilege to really, really transform myself for a role.”

Related content:

Riverdale

HOW/WHEN & WHERE TO WATCH: 8p.m. on The CW

Riverdale High presents Heathers: The Musical. Yup, Riverdale is back with another musical episode! This time around, the students are in rehearsals for “Heathers: The Musical” with Cheryl (Madelaine Petsch) taking on the roles as queen bee Heather Chandler, natch. Elsewhere, Betty (Lili Reinhart) is irked by Evelyn’s (guest star Zoé De Grand’Maison) involvement with the musical and, just in general, in the lives of her friends. Meanwhile, Veronica (Camila Mendes) learns some devastating news about her family, and Archie (KJ Apa) and Josie (Ashleigh Murray) make a decision about their future.

Related content:

Buble!

HOW/WHEN & WHERE TO WATCH: 10p.m. on NBC

Michael Bublé returns to NBC for his seventh musical special. Accompanied by a 36-piece orchestra, the crooner will perform classics such as “My Funny Valentine,” “Fly Me To The Moon,” and “You’re Nobody ‘Til Somebody Loves You,” as well as “La Vie En Rose” as a duet with Cécile McLorin Salvant.

Related Links:

What ELSE to Watch

8 p.m.
Pretty Little Liars: The Perfectionists (series debut) — Freeform

9 p.m.
All American (season 1 finale) The CW

*times are ET and subject to change

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F.D.A. Approves First Drug for Postpartum Depression

Stephanie Hathaway, 33, a mother of two in South Windsor, Conn., had no history of depression. But after giving birth to her daughters — Hadley, 4, and Brenley, 2 — she began crying nonstop, and lost interest in doing things she loved, like cooking and socializing.

“I starting having intrusive thoughts that would not go away,” she recalled. “‘Your daughter deserves a better mom, and your husband deserves a better wife’ — that would just play on repeat.”

Ultimately Ms. Hathaway felt suicidal and feared she would harm herself if she stopped holding the baby. After Hadley’s birth, Ms. Hathaway, then living with her husband in China, spent two weeks under round-the-clock suicide watch at home.

The antidepressant she was prescribed, Zoloft, took three months, at increasing dosages, to eliminate her symptoms. Following Brenley’s birth, Zoloft didn’t help at all, Ms. Hathaway said, so about five months afterward, she volunteered for the brexanolone trial.

Between 12 and 18 hours after the infusion started, “I actually woke up from a nap and those intrusive thoughts that played on repeat, they were gone,” said Ms. Hathaway.

After leaving the hospital, “I felt like myself again,” Ms. Hathaway said. “I’m not going to say I was 100 percent, but I will say there was so much less of a gap to get there.”

She did not stop antidepressants altogether, but switched to a low dose of Effexor.

Dizziness and sleepiness were the most common side effects in the trials, each affecting about one in eight patients, including Ms. Hathaway. The most worrisome effect, the F.D.A. said, was fainting or temporary loss of consciousness, seen in five patients. All recovered within an hour and resumed getting the infusion.

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